The Wrap and Tuck Banding Method

Bands and Bandsets | 6 comments

The most popular band attachment method is the “Wrap and Tuck.” It’s been around for ages, works for modern forks as well as naturals, and requires just a strip of rubber and no tools (or a tool as simple as the lanyard on your slingshot.)

For the photos, we’re using the Scout and the included lanyard as the loop. You can also use a piece of ribbon, wire, any sturdy pulling device, foreceps or just your thumb. You may also use office rubber bands for tie-in material.

OK. Let’s get started! Seven steps to completing the Wrap and Tuck band attachment method.

1. Lay down one wrap of tie material on target side of slingshot.
1. Lay down one wrap of tie material on target side of slingshot.

This creates a strong “grippy” base for the band. The wrap and tuck relies on this friction, so take advantage of it with this step.

2. Place the band over the back of the slingshot (target side) and begin wrapping.
2. Place the band over the back of the slingshot (target side) and begin wrapping.

Don’t pull so tight that it’s impossible to hold, but make sure it’s snug enough to be sure the band won’t wiggle loose.

3. Apply at least three wraps, stretching the tie in material as you wrap.
3. Apply at least three wraps, stretching the tie in material as you wrap.

Again, stretch it tight, but don’t over or under-do it. You should be able to get 3 or more full wraps.

4. After at least three tensioned wraps, place a loop on the target side of the band grooves.
4. After at least three tensioned wraps, place a loop on the target side of the band grooves.

This could be your lanyard (shown) or any loop of wire (not too thin / sharp though), ribbon, or even your thumb.

 

5. Make TWO more tensioned wraps.
5. Make TWO more tensioned wraps.

These wraps lock in the end, so don’t skimp here. Keep them tight and aligned well to hold the band securely.

 

6. Carefully holding the tensioned wraps in place, feed the tag end through the loop.
6. Carefully holding the tensioned wraps in place, feed the tag end through the loop.

Don’t lose your grip or all that work can vanish in an instant. (We’ve all had it happen. Don’t worry if it does; just try again!)

7. Pull the loop back underneath the final two wraps.
7. Pull the loop back underneath the final two wraps.

If you’re using your thumb, roll your thumb out, pulling the end with it. Tricky at first. with practice, it’s all muscle memory. Easy!

That's it! The finished product.
That’s it! The finished product.

Pull the end all the way through, or leave a loop as shown for easy removal.

It’s an old video, but it does the trick. Here you can watch the process of the Wrap and Tuck method for slingshot banding happen on video. Keep practicing if you find it difficult. It won’t always be so tough!

If you’d rather skip this method altogether, consider the Ocularis™ or FlipClip™ banding systems. Both accommodate various bands (flats or tubes) and thicknesses. Check out these three slingshots for each band attachment method.

Wrap and Tuck

Ocularis™ example

FlipClip™ Slingshot

We’d love to hear from you!

Do you use the Wrap and Tuck method? Or are you a banding system person? Let us (and everyone else) know in the comments below!

The 18 minute slingshot

Seven simple steps to perfect the Wrap and Tuck band attachment method. Learn with this step-by-step tutorial and video.

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